How Pharmacist Nick Bova Helps Keep Animals Healthy Through His Business

Many forms of medication are meant to be administered in very specific ways and only to certain patients. This is true of both the many types of medicine that benefit people and those that are meant to treat animals.

In quite a few cases, it turns out to be helpful to be able to modify certain medications in order to better suit particular patients. Human patients have enjoyed the benefits of this compounding process for many years. A company founded by experienced pharmacist Nick Bova now provides the same kinds of services for animals.

Animals Can Be Even More Difficult to Treat Than People

Because the lives of human beings are typically valued more highly than those of animals, many suppose that providing healthcare for the former must be more difficult than veterinary medicine. While healthcare professionals who focus on people will often go to far greater lengths and expense to keep their patients healthy and alive, veterinarians face plenty of challenges themselves.

Conscious, thinking people, for example, can typically be counted upon to cooperate in their own courses of treatment. Being able to understand that an unpleasant duty will contribute to improved health is typically all that it takes for a patient to muster the willpower and determination needed to follow a doctor’s orders.

Animals, on the other hand, are simply incapable of coming to such realizations. As a result, veterinarians must frequently look for different ways to provide care that would not normally be possible in the absence of a patient’s cooperation. Compounded medication regularly turns out to be exactly what is needed in such situations and others.

Healthier, Happier Animal Patients

Once a veterinarian has recognized that a certain medication could be helpful but will not be easily administered in its standard form, a compounded version can then be ordered, instead. Many cats, for example, will habitually refuse to take any kind of oral medication at all, even to the point of developing ways of surreptitiously spitting medicine out if it is forced upon them. A compounding pharmacy that can turn a certain form of medication into one that an otherwise reluctant patient will accept can help enable types of treatment that would otherwise be impossible to contemplate.